Your negligee is showing

Now that I have written a post about questions… I have a question!

Seeing as the most common defense for racist acts is that any offense was not intended, what role, if any, does negligence play in racism?

Proposing a new term here: the negligee racist, a much more amusing visual combined with a proportionate degree of levity.

Negligent sounds so malignant and you can be assured, anyone using the negligee defense does not want to be considered malignant. In fact, inappropriately bringing up such thoughts can inadvertently bring forth the very malignancy being denied.

So next time you are stereotyped, racially-profiled, mammied, ridiculed, put down, followed around a shop by security, refused service, asked where you are from 17 times in one minute, abused on public transport, die in police custody, etc consider that you’ve not been the victim of racism, you’ve simply been negligee’d.

Negligee racism. A curious but generally considered harmless Aussie social ritual specifically designed for the purposes of paying tribute to the most beautiful, interesting and capable members of our society – really, if you cop some negligee racism, you should feel especially privileged. You’ve been seen, noted, honoured with that special brand of reverse-logic we are famous for and suitably brought back down – to level the playing field somewhat.

You must really spare a thought for those who aren’t special enough to be on the receiving end of such outstanding and effortful tribute. A certain degree of over-stated humility is considered very appropriate when receiving negligee tributes, it makes the racist (oops, negligee-ist) feel their efforts are being appreciated.

ooo…negligee…sounds posh

 

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16 thoughts on “Your negligee is showing

  1. I like the term, I mean, not in terms of the definition, but it’s quite clever. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  2. ddigman says:

    Thank you for the mind picture I now have inside my head of a band of KKK members wearing Victoria’s Secret underneath their white sheets.

    Come to think of it, whenever the KKK comes up, now also does Donald Trump. How’s that for a mind-worm? Would he go for crotchless?

    I think your premise, whilst interesting, misses a point.

    The entire basis for negligence being the excuse for racism is if you accept that it does in fact constitute an excuse.

    You hit on a truth there when you used the word ‘malignant’. Now in order for a malignant growth to be malignant, must it intend itself to be malignant, or is its malignancy and inherent part of it being a malignant growth?

    Liked by 1 person

    • jamborobyn says:

      I’m assuming you realise this is satire, yes? So negligence is not an any excuse in any way shape or form, which is why I’ve gone down the negligee road.

      So many people express a frustration with the word racism, or racist, regardless of whether it is an accurate description of their behaviour or not.

      The simple and obvious way to avoid being called racist, is to NOT BE RACIST. But that idea does not compute for a lot of people, so… in the interests of poking fun at the oppressor…

      Liked by 1 person

      • ddigman says:

        I am aware. Farce and satire are the best approaches to things like these!

        One other awful trend I’ve noticed is the ridiculous idea of ‘reverse racism’ (and ‘reverse sexism’, ‘reverse thisism’, ‘reverse thatism’).

        To me, if a person of one race denigrates another person on the basis of race, they are being racist. Whether one is paisley and regards the polka-dots as inferior, or one is amber and has low regard for those puces over there, the main tool in the armament of the intolerant seems to be the mangling of words.

        Now I need to get back to my web search. You have got me looking for pictures of negligees and racists.

        I can feel a meme attack coming on…

        Liked by 1 person

    • jamborobyn says:

      I really loved that malignancy mind twister at the end of your comment – gold!

      Like

  3. ddigman says:

    You do realise this could lead to an entire new range of ‘negligee racist’ memes, don’t you?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. DesertAbba says:

    You ever think of doing ‘stand up comedy?’ You are one funny lady! The only problem is that the negligeents are incapable of getting it. Hope your summer is going well! Spring is hinting at an arrival here.

    Liked by 1 person

    • jamborobyn says:

      Thank you for the compliment. Yeah, I’m reasonably sure I would be playing to an empty house if I tried stand-up, which would be kind of amusing in it’s own way… 😉 Summer is technically over but we have this beautiful, warm, sunny day today which I’m off to enjoy now. I really appreciate your feedback, it put a little spring in my step.

      Like

  5. sojourner says:

    Robyn, you are brilliant and filled with wisdom!

    I am sorry that you, and multitudes of others, have had to endure this kind of asinine behavior, this unwarranted abuse, and from people who are not fit to be in the same room with you!

    I cling to hope that someday this will all have been changed, and humanity will have become united. But this is still a long, long way off, unfortunately.

    Liked by 1 person

    • jamborobyn says:

      No need to be sorry, it’s just part of the landscape. I had an interesting online discussion yesterday about an article where the author referred to herself as an Australian-born Ethiopian. The article was all about how clueless Australians are when it comes to differentiating countries in Africa. To demonstrate her own degree of cluelessness she referred to her discovery that you don’t pronounce the g in Igbo ?!@#?? I can’t even speak to that.

      The way the conversation panned out led to this particular piece of writing. Essentially I suggested that the continual distancing of the author from everyday Australians throughout the article made it sound like judgement from afar and difficult for the message to be digested. I couldn’t even figure out what the author’s point was exactly, except perhaps a general whinge. The article told me so much about the author’s state of mind and virtually nothing about her topic.

      So the lady I was communicating with felt that part of the effects of racism is the way we have to shift our voice to be heard. Mainly because I suggested possibly establishing the “we” identification before raising criticism, drawing similarities first (if you want anyone to listen and not go into automatic defense mode).

      I believe that our voice is shifted by our experiences, therefore anyone who has suffered and spoken out, anyone who has lived more than a day, cannot expect to have a voice that is separate from their life experience. The quality and tone of that voice denotes the distance travelled on the journey of healing, overcoming, or surviving – the general stuff of life.

      The life I have lived has made me and my voice what it is. Writing humourously about something that used to cripple my self-esteem, that’s some distance I have travelled over the past few years. So it is what it is and I have mostly learned to live with it, even if I do consider taking the racist approach to human interactions as a serious mental malfunction. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  6. sojourner says:

    “I believe that our voice is shifted by our experiences, therefore anyone who has suffered and spoken out, anyone who has lived more than a day, cannot expect to have a voice that is separate from their life experience. The quality and tone of that voice denotes the distance travelled on the journey of healing, overcoming, or surviving – the general stuff of life.”

    I have never thought about it in this context. But I believe you are right, Robyn. And there are some who don’t wish to allow us to have that voice we have acquired on our sojourn.

    “So it is what it is and I have mostly learned to live with it, even if I do consider taking the racist approach to human interactions as a serious mental malfunction.”

    You should write a book. And I am not blowing smoke or joking here. The world could use your sanity right now!

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Slam dunk, Robyn 🙂 There are so many versions and layerings in this continuum from plain ignorance to downright nasty, killer-level racism, it boggles the mind.

    Liked by 1 person

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